Awards and Announcements


Mel Griem, MD
Melvin L. Griem, MD, professor emeritus in the Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology at the University of Chicago, was among the first to work with heavy particle emitters instead of X-rays, and he helped create the neutron therapy unit at the University of Chicago in the 1970s.
Radiation Therapy Pioneer Melvin Griem, MD, 1925-2011


A leader in the early days of radiation therapy for cancer, Melvin L. Griem, MD, professor emeritus in the Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology at the University of Chicago, died of pneumonia in Chicago on February 7, 2011. He was 85.
 
Griem was a pioneer who helped to establish radiation oncology — the use of radiation to treat cancer — as a separate field from radiology, which focused on diagnostic imaging. He was among the first to work with heavy particle emitters instead of X-rays, and he helped create the neutron therapy unit at the University of Chicago in the 1970s. He performed important studies on the long-term consequences of radiation exposure in a therapeutic setting.
 
He was a member of a small group of Chicago radiologists who successfully lobbied for a separate journal, specialty board and professional society for the emerging field, which culminated in formation of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology.
 
Griem combined “a background in physics, a medical education, a concern for patients with cancer, broad vision, unbridled enthusiasm and energy,” said Harold Sutton, MD, professor emeritus of radiation oncology at the University of Chicago, who came to the institution as a surgical resident but was converted to radiation oncology by Griem’s enthusiasm for the field. “He was a special man who met the multiple opportunities and challenges of a rapidly evolving specialty with great creative energy and vision.”
 
Read here for more about Melvin Griem.




Alpha Omega Alpha Class of 2011 Elects Alumni, Faculty and Resident Honorees

The Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) Class of 2011 has elected a number of University of Chicago faculty, residents and alumni to the Illinois Beta Chapter (University of Chicago) of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. These individuals will be honored at the annual AOA banquet on February 22. Lawrence D.H. Wood, MD, PhD, dean for medical education (emeritus) and professor of medicine (emeritus) in the Section of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, will be the keynote speaker.

Each fall, AOA medical students elect faculty based on their demonstrated commitment to scholarly excellence and medical education. Residents and fellows are elected for their continued achievement, promise and leadership qualities. Alumni are judged on the basis of their achievement to date and only become eligible 10 years after graduation.

Individuals elected to AOA are as follows:
 
Alumni

Thomas L. Fisher, MD ’01
White House Fellow
United States Department of Health and Human Services
 
William A. McDade, MD ’90, PhD ’88
Department of Anesthesia & Critical Care
Deputy Provost for Research and Minority Issues
 
Faculty

Anne E. Hong, MD
Department of Medicine
Assistant Professor of Medicine
 
Shalini T. Reddy, MD
Department of Medicine
Associate Professor of Medicine
 
Housestaff

Jeremy Raider Estrada, MD
Department of Medicine
Internal Medicine Resident
 
Cassandra Lall, MD ’08
Department of Surgery
 
Michael Shao, MD
Department of Surgery
Fellow of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy

Volunteer Clinical Faculty Award*

George Kim, MD
NorthShore University HealthSystem
Department of Nephrology
Clinical Assistant Professor

*While this award does not confer AOA membership, it recognizes a community physician who contributes with distinction to the education and training of clinical students.




Health Care Integrity Program Revised

The 2011 Annual Health Care Integrity Program (Compliance) Announcement is available for review, said Krista M. Curell, RN, vice president and chief compliance officer of the Medical Center.

Curell said there were two significant changes from the 2010 document:

  • HIPAA Policy Revision:
The HIPAA Steering Committee voted to revise the privacy policies to allow University of Chicago Medical Center / Division of the Biological Sciences professionals with current access to the protected health information (PHI) systems the authority to view their own medical records. The policy exception applies only to each professional’s individual PHI. Federal and state privacy regulations strictly prohibit each employee from reviewing records belonging to his or her spouse/partner or children.
  • Annual Fraud and Awareness Training Program:*
Effective January 1, the annual Fraud Awareness Compliance training obligation timeline moved from a calendar year track with a November deadline to a fiscal year track. The next training period will begin with fiscal year 2012 and run from July 1, 2011, with a deadline of June 30, 2012. This change was implemented in order to align faculty training requirements on the same schedule, i.e. Fraud Awareness with Safety/Legal. The live sessions of fraud awareness training also will be limited to 60-minute periods. Scheduling for these sessions will begin in July. The training requirement still may be fulfilled by completing one of the online modules.

To view the 2011 announcement, copy and paste the following into your browser: https://adm-roscoe-secure.bsd.uchicago.edu/compliance/secure/Documents/Compliance%20Announcement%20Letter_2011.pdf

For more information, contact Tracy Volel, associate compliance officer, at 4-4733 or tvolel@bsd.uchicago.edu.
 
* The Annual Fraud and Awareness Training Program is mandatory for all faculty, residents and staff involved in the professional fee billing process and facility Evaluation and Management documentation.





Katherine Pakieser-Reed, RN, PhD, director of the University of Chicago Medical Center’s Center for Nursing Professional Practice and Research
Katherine Pakieser-Reed, RN, PhD, director of the University of Chicago Medical Center’s Center for Nursing Professional Practice and Research
A Dose of Inspiration

Katherine Pakieser-Reed, RN, PhD, director of the University of Chicago Medical Center’s Center for Nursing Professional Practice and Research, recently added “author” to her list of professional accomplishments. Her new book A Daybook for Nurse Educators was released in January by Sigma Theta Tau International.

Reflecting her firsthand understanding of the role inspiration plays in keeping nurse educators fresh and motivated, the daybook is filled with motivational words, introducing each month with a thought-provoking essay and containing a meaningful quote for each day of the year, including leap year. The book is designed to be used as a daily journal where nurses can record their thoughts about the quotes themselves, or the day’s successes and challenges.

Pakieser-Reed solicited the quotes from nurse educators in every type of role. She sent out nearly 2,000 invitations to participate, and selected 366 quotes from 246 nurses, some of whom are on staff at the Medical Center. There are no days in the book – only dates – allowing nurses to use it year after year. And 90 percent of the book’s quotes are original and never have been published before, the highest percentage for any book published by Sigma Theta Tau International.

Pakieser-Reed, whose 27-year career as a nurse has included roles as bedside nurse, nurse journalist, coordinator of continuing education, public health manager, clinical faculty and consultant, said inspirational reading materials have provided her tremendous comfort and motivation through the years. Writing the book also came naturally to her because prior to her career in nursing, Pakieser-Reed studied to be a journalist.

A Daybook for Nurse Educators is available for purchase here and also will be sold at national nursing conferences.


New Central Scheduling Office Opens in Department of Radiology

Staff in the Department of Radiology recently celebrated the opening of a new centralized scheduling office. The change will make it easier for referring physicians and patients to contact the department, said Rosalie Hughes, manager of Patient Access. Before the new office opened, staff who handled scheduling were spread across several buildings throughout the Medical Center. Now they work together in one office, with a single telephone number.

The new central number for radiology scheduling is 5-9723 or (773) 795-9723.



Radiology Central Scheduling_rs
Photos by David Christopher     

Celebrating the opening of the Radiology Central Scheduling office are Department of Radiology staff members:

Back row, left to right: Michelle Buchanan, administrative assistant; Todd Dunn, clinical coordinator; Curtis Harris, clinical coordinator; Francine Haynes, administrative assistant; and Tanika Stevens, clinical coordinator.

Front row, left to right: Laquesha Fleming, clinical coordinator; Renita Goolsby-Jackson, administrative assistant; Ellen Carrillo, administrative assistant; Florrie Brooks, clinical coordinator; and Rosalie Hughes, manager of Patient Access.

Radiology Central Scheduling2_rs

Those attending the celebration also included (left to right) Ronald O’Drobinak, construction specialist in the Department of Facilities, Design and Construction; Monica Geyer, assistant director of Specialty Imaging Services in the Department of Radiology; David Paushter, MD, vice chairman of clinical operations and section chief of abdominal imaging in the Department of Radiology; and Rosalie Hughes, manager of Patient Access.



Gold Humanism Honor Society Inductions Scheduled

The Fifth Annual Gold Humanism Honor Society Induction Ceremony will take place at 6 p.m.  March 3 in Bond Chapel. The Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) honors senior medical students, residents, role-model physician teachers and other exemplars recognized for demonstrated excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service.
 
During the ceremony, the 2011 Pritzker School of Medicine Gold Humanism Honor Society inductees will be recognized and their class will honor both the faculty member and the member of their graduating class whom they have chosen to receive the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.
 
2011 Pritzker School of Medicine Gold Humanism Honor Society Inductees:
  
  Emily Bethea  
  Nathan Cardoos  
  Eric Chen  
  Minna Chen  
  Jonathan Cooper  
  Micah Croft  
  Eugenie Du  
  Tessa Gonzalez  
  Laura Kaplan  
  Prerna Kumar  
  Priyanka Kumar  
  Adam Mikolajczyk  
  Cary Paine  
  Megan Prochaska  
  Deana Shenaq  
  Ravi Sood  
  Marion Stanley  
  Joseph Tasosa
  Melissa Weston
  Joshua Williams   
  
 
Election to the honor society is based upon recommendations from the rising fourth-year class, with final deliberations made by the GHHS Selection Committee. For additional information about the GHHS, please visit this link on the Pritzker website: http://pritzker.uchicago.edu/current/students/gold.shtml




Michael Davidson, MD
Photo courtesy of UChicago Tech

Michael Davidson, MD, director of Preventive Cardiology
Davidson Studies Novel Gene Therapy to Lower Cholesterol


Michael Davidson, MD, director of Preventive Cardiology, is currently developing a new genetic therapy that may help lower cholesterol levels.

Davidson, clinical professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, has co-founded two start-up companies: SonoGene and Omthera Pharmaceuticals. SonoGene is developing a novel therapeutic product to reduce fatty cholesterol deposits (plaques) in arteries by increasing the body’s production of HDL cholesterol, thus reversing the process underlying the development of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Omthera Pharmaceuticals is conducting Phase III clinical trails on an Omega 3 fatty acid compound designed to provide superior blood levels of Omega 3s in patients with both low- and high-fat diets.

In collaboration with others at the University of Chicago, Davidson has developed a promising initial result for a combination therapy that may help lower cholesterol levels. The discovery came as a surprise, he said.

Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is a multi-step process through which the body regulates the movement and management of LDL (bad cholesterol) utilizing HDL (good cholesterol), the liver, bile, several enzymes and other factors. RCT actually can reduce the plaque buildup in arteries and thereby lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis.

Davidson set out to find a way to make HDL more effective in this process. Using a two-pronged approach, he blocked a gene that regulates how much LDL is transported to the intestines, then introduced a bio-acid binding drug so that more LDL would be eliminated from the body.

“Expecting this to double the reduction of LDL, we were extremely surprised to find a 60-fold increase in the amount of LDL that was eliminated in the stool,” Davidson said.

Davidson and UChicagoTech, the university’s Office of Technology and Intellectual Property, are trying to build the idea into a company and/or attract a pharmaceutical company as a partner in developing this novel therapy.

“Dr. Davidson is very interested in partnerships between academic researchers and commercial endeavors,” said Adam Conway, project manager at UChicagoTech. “He’s a great example of the academic entrepreneurialism that is found across campus.”








David Meltzer, MD, PhD
David Meltzer, MD, PhD, chief of the Section of Hospital Medicine at the Medical Center
Meltzer Appointed to Federal Patient Care Task Force

David Meltzer, MD, PhD, chief of the Section of Hospital Medicine at the Medical Center, has been appointed to a 15-member federal task force that was assembled to help to improve patient care in the United States.

Meltzer will serve on the Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). The committee is helping to develop and update methodological standards and guidance for comparative clinical effectiveness research. "The men and women named today bring impressive credentials and experience to this important task," said Gene L. Dodaro, Comptroller General of the United States and head of the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO).

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act authorized PCORI as a non-profit corporation to assist patients, clinicians, purchasers, and policymakers in making informed health decisions by providing quality, relevant evidence on how best to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor diseases and other health conditions.

Meltzer serves as director of the Center for Health and the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago, as well as associate professor of medicine at the Medical Center. He also is an associate professor in the Graduate School of Public Studies at the university.

The Act directs the Comptroller General to appoint up to 15 members to PCORI's Methodology Committee. In addition to the 15 members appointed today, the Director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the Director of the National Institutes of Health, or their designees, will also serve on the committee.






Social Worker Received Certification as a Board Certified Diplomate in Clinical Social Work

Rina Murao, LCSW, CADC, a social worker from the Center for Heart Failure and Heart Transplant, received certification as a Board Certified Diplomate in Clinical Social Work (BCD) in September 2010.

The BCD is recognized as the premier advanced-generalist practice certification for clinical social work. Eligibility requires a master’s or doctoral degree in social work with a focus on direct practice, state licensure at the highest clinical level, five years of post-graduate clinical social work and 40 hours of clinical continual education. BCD clinicians must recertify annually.

Murao has worked for the Center for Heart Failure and Heart Transplant since December 2005.





Abelson  Montag
Herbert T. Abelson, MD, senior associate dean for admissionsAnthony Montag, MD, professor of pathology and surgery
Abelson to Retire as Associate Dean for Admissions; Succeeded by Montag

Herbert T. Abelson, MD, will retire from his position as senior associate dean for admissions effective April 1, 2011.  For the past six years he has served Pritzker School of Medicine with dedication and enthusiasm.
 
Since beginning his tenure with our Office of Admissions in April 2005, Abelson has been a noteworthy contributor to many positive outcomes for the admissions team and student programs. His work has helped to increase the visibility and reputation of Pritzker’s academic program on a national level.

Anthony Montag, MD, professor of pathology and surgery, will replace Abelson as associate dean for admissions. Montag has served as an active member of the admissions committee for the past several years and most recently as one of the committee chairs. He was recognized for thoughtful, rigorous and fair assessments that earned the respect of faculty, students and staff. Montag will work closely with Abelson over the next several months to effect a smooth transition.

Abelson’s next “role” will be that of grandfather, as he and his wife will soon be moving east to spend time with their family and grandchildren.








Monica Vela, MD
Monica Vela, MD, associate professor of medicine and new interim assistant dean of Multicultural Affairs
Vela New Interim Assistant Dean for Multicultural Affairs

Monica Vela, MD, associate professor of medicine, will assume the role of interim assistant dean for Multicultural Affairs beginning January 20, 2011, effective until the appointment of the associate dean for Multicultural Affairs is made.
 
As director of the Health Care Disparities in America course,  Vela has been deeply involved in encouraging student awareness of this pervasive issue. Vela was named a fellow of the Academy of Distinguished Medical Educators at the University of Chicago in 2009, and was the recipient of the 2007 Midwest Society of General Internal Medicine Clinician Educator of the Year Award. Vela also serves as the chair for diversity in the Department of Medicine. In this role, Vela works to improve recruitment, retention, scholarship, leadership and mentorship of qualified minority students, house staff, and faculty in an environment rich with cultural awareness, and sensitivity.
 
As interim assistant dean, Vela will be involved in mentorship, career counseling and overall student guidance. She also will help ensure that future classes at the Pritzker School of Medicine represent the breadth of experience and background that are valued at the University of Chicago.







Odenike, MD
Olatoyosi Odenike, MD, assistant professor of medicine
Odenike a Discussant at Hematology/Oncology Town Hall Meeting

Get up to speed on cancer care. Olatoyosi Odenike, MD, assistant professor of medicine, will join other leading hematologists and oncologists from seven Chicagoland hospitals at a free annual Town Hall Meeting, presented by the Leukemia Research Foundation, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on January 30 at Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Feinberg Pavilion, 251 E. Huron Street, in Chicago. The meeting takes place on the 3rd floor in Conference Room A.













Eric E. Whitaker
Eric E. Whitaker, MD, vice president for strategic affiliations and associate dean for community-based research

Whitaker a Panelist at Chicago Tribune's Chicago Forward: A Healthy Chicago

Watch a panel discussion hosted by the Chicago Tribune from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on February 1 at the Murphy Auditorium, 50 E. Erie St. The panel discussion, which includes Mehmet Oz, MD, of The Dr. Oz Show; Eric E. Whitaker, MD, vice president for strategic affiliations and associate dean for community-based research; and Donna Thompson, CEO of Access Community Health Network, will talk about the future of health care in Chicago. For more information, visit
chicagotribune.com/TribNation.












Joel Kleinman
Joel E. Kleinman, MD ’73, PhD ’74, chief of the Section on Neuropathology at the National Institutes of Mental Health
Alumnus to Present "Genetic Variation and Alternative Transcripts in Normal Human Brain Development and Schizophrenia" Lecture

Joel E. Kleinman, MD ’73, PhD ’74, chief of the Section on Neuropathology at the National Institutes of Mental Health, will present “Genetic Variation and Alternative Transcripts in Normal Human Brain Development and Schizophrenia” at the University of Chicago. The lecture is from 4 to 5 p.m. on February 1 in Room 101 at the Cummings Life Science Center, 920 E. 58th Street. Persons with disabilities should call (773) 702-2464 for assistance.















Lynda Hale and James Bowman
From left to right: Lynda Hale, the administrative director of the University of Chicago Medical Center; and James Bowman, MD, professor emeritus, received the University's 2011 Diversity Leadership Awards.
Bowman and Hale Receive Diversity Leadership Awards

Professor Emeritus James Bowman and Medical Center administrative director Lynda Hale received the university’s 2011 Diversity Leadership Awards during a special reception in their honor on January 13, 2011.

The awards recognize university staff members who display leadership in fostering diversity, both on campus and within the surrounding community. The awards also highlight, in concert with the University of Chicago Board of Governors, the contributions of alumni who advance the causes of justice and equality.

Bowman, professor emeritus in pathology and medicine, received the Diversity Leadership Award for Alumni, which recognizes leaders who advance social justice and equality at the university and more broadly. Hale, administrative director of the Primary Care Group, received the Diversity Leadership Award for Staff, which honors employees who are exemplary leaders in the university’s efforts to support diversity on campus and in the community.

Bowman, an internationally recognized expert in pathology, genetics and sickle cell anemia, was selected to receive the award for his commitment to mentoring students and supporting the career development of young medical professionals. He has been a role model to many Pritzker School of Medicine students. He also was honored for placing a spotlight on health disparities and emphasizing the need for quality medical care for underserved minorities.

Bowman served as assistant dean of students for Minority Affairs from 1986 to 1990, and continues to serve on the Committee on Genetics and the Committee on African and African American Studies. As a researcher on sickle cell anemia — which affects an estimated 72,000 people in the United States, mostly of African ancestry, and millions worldwide — Bowman served as the Principal Investigator of the University’s Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center.

Hale was recognized for her work to help her staff members advance in their careers and education – for example, by developing flexible work hours and encouraging them to learn new skills. Organizers of the Diversity Awards said she also extends her mentoring role to her volunteer work with the international program Dress for Success, which provides career coaching and clothing for disadvantaged women seeking permanent employment. She also volunteers with many local programs and institutions, such as After School Matters, the Bronzeville Children’s Museum and the DuSable Museum of African American History.

More information
about the awards can be found here.






Kathleen DeVries
Kathleen DeVries, the incoming vice-president for marking and communications
DeVries Named New Vice President for Marketing and Communications

Kathleen A. DeVries, an experienced marketing professional for academic medical centers, will join the University of Chicago Medical Center as vice president for marketing and communications, beginning February 7, 2011.

DeVries will coordinate the Medical Center’s business development efforts and oversee the marketing function, advancing and protecting the Medical Center’s brand. She will work closely with the Medical Center, the Division of Biological Sciences (BSD), the Pritzker School of Medicine and practice plan leadership. In addition, DeVries will manage Medical Center and BSD communications in coordination with the university.

DeVries is director of marketing at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis, which includes Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Siteman Cancer Center, Barnes-Jewish West County Hospital and Goldfarb School of Nursing. She also served as assistant vice president of marketing and planning for Duke Medicine in 2006. From 1989 to 2005, she worked at Froedtert Hospital and Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, where she served as vice president of marketing and strategic support.

DeVries is immediate past chair of the University Healthsystem Consortium Chief Marketing Office Council, and a member of the Healthcare Executive Forum. She has published articles in marketing journals on brand development and consumer health care decision-making.








2011 Invitation to Nominate for The Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research

 
Nominations are being accepted for The Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research. This prestigious award recognizes individuals whose scientific research has made, or has the potential to make, significant transformational contributions toward the improvement of human health.
 
Candidates will be evaluated by an independent selection committee of researchers from around the world.

Nomination forms are available at pauljanssenaward.com and will be accepted until February 15, 2011. The winner(s) will receive a $100,000 cash prize and broad international recognition for their achievements.
 
The 2011 Dr. Paul Janssen Award winner will be announced in the second half of 2011.
 
The Dr. Paul Janssen Award was established by Johnson & Johnson in 2004 in honor of the legacy of Paul Janssen, MD. Known to his colleagues as “Dr. Paul,” Janssen was a physician-scientist who helped improve millions of lives through his contribution to the discovery and development of more than 80 medicines, four of which remain on the World Health Organization’s list of essential medicines. Janssen Pharmaceutica, N.V., which Janssen founded in 1953, joined the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies in 1961. Visit pauljanssenaward.com to learn more.





Leigh Van Valen
Leigh Van Valen, PhD, professor emeritus in the Department of Ecology and Evolution
Memorial Service and Symposium for Leigh Van Valen

There will be a memorial service for Leigh Van Valen, PhD, professor emeritus in the Department of Ecology and Evolution, at 3 p.m. on January 13, 2011, in Bond Chapel (1025 E 58th St.) at the University of Chicago, followed by a reception in the Social Sciences Tea Room. All are invited. Benedikt Halgrimsson, a former student of Van Valen, will present the Evolutionary Morphology seminar later that evening.

Also, there will be a graduate student-organized symposium in remembrance of Van Valen on January 14, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Max Palevsky Cinema in Ida Noyes Hall. All are welcome to attend. The organizers have invited three speakers who represent academic areas in which Van Valen was interested. They are: John Damuth, a research biologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara; Frederic Bouchard, assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Montreal; and Carl Simpson, a post-doctoral student at the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin. The symposium will run from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and will be held in the Palevsky Cinema in Ida Noyes Hall.

The originator of the influential and widely debated Red Queen hypothesis, Van Valen, a member of the Committees on Evolutionary Biology, Genetics and the Conceptual Foundations of Science at the University of Chicago, died at St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital Center in Chicago on October 16, 2010, from a recurrent respiratory infection. He was 75 years old.
Read his obituary.








Eugene Goldwasser
Eugene Goldwasser, PhD, the Alice Hogge and Arthur A. Baer professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biology
Eugene Goldwasser, PhD, 1922 - 2010, Biochemist Behind Blockbuster Drug

Eugene Goldwasser, PhD, the Alice Hogge and Arthur A. Baer professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Chicago and the scientist who first purified erythropoietin — the hormone that stimulates the production of red blood cells — died from complications related to advanced prostate cancer on Friday, Dec. 17, 2010, at his home in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. He was 88.

Generally regarded as the "father of EPO," a drug that helped launch the biotechnology revolution, Goldwasser led the team that succeeded, after 25 years of concentrated effort, in purifying first sheep, then human erythropoietin, a discovery that has enabled millions of dialysis patients and anemic patients with other diseases to live longer and more productive lives.

Goldwasser completed his bachelor's degree in biochemistry at the University of Chicago in March 1943. After World War II, Goldwasser returned to the University in 1952 as an instructor in biochemistry. He stayed for the rest of his career, rising to professor of biochemistry and molecular biology in 1963 and chair of the department from 1984 to 1985. He retired at age 65 in 1987, but remained active in his laboratory and served again as department chair from 1994 to 1998. He also served as chair of the Committee on Developmental Biology from 1976 to 1991. Goldwasser retired again in 2002.

He received several honors, including election as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and, most recently, the 2005 Prince Mahidol Award, from Thailand, given for "outstanding performance and/or research in the field of medicine for the benefit of mankind."

He is survived by his wife, Deone Jackman, and three sons: Thomas, of San Francisco; Matthew, of Chicago; and James, of New York; two stepchildren, Tom and Tara Jackman; and seven grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel on Monday, Jan. 24, at 4 p.m.
Read his obituary.







Mark Chastang
Mark Chastang, former vice-president for Operations and Transplant Services
Chastang Resigns as VP for Operations and Transplant Services

The University of Chicago Medical Center has announced that Mark Chastang has resigned as vice president for Operations and Transplant Services. Chastang has agreed to assist the Medical Center on a consulting basis to complete the transition with respect to the initiatives he had been leading. The Medical Center wishes Chastang well in his future endeavors.


















Lou Philipson
Lou Philipson, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the Kovler Diabetes Center
Philipson to Serve as President of the American Diabetes Association's Community Leadership Board

Lou Philipson, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and director of the Kovler Diabetes Center at the University of Chicago Medical Center, has accepted the offer to serve as president of the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) Community Leadership Board in 2011. 
 
Philipson has been active with the ADA on a national basis, serving on the 2010 Board of Directors, and is a past recipient of ADA Research Award funding.

According to Jeanette Flom, executive director of the ADA, among the future goals of the ADA will be bringing the science and research side of the organization to light by sharing information and recruiting additional leadership from the diabetes community to represent the work of the Community Leadership Board. 










Richard Baron
Richard Baron, MD, professor of radiology and chairman of the Department of Radiology
Baron Appointed New Dean for Clinical Practice

Effective January 7, 2011, Richard Baron, MD, chair of the Department of Radiology, will assume the new position of Dean for Clinical Practice. He will use and extend the clinical practice infrastructure that already exists in the Faculty Practice Plan and will work closely with Kenneth Polonsky, MD, executive vice president for Medical Affairs, dean of the Division of Biological Sciences and dean of the Pritzker School of Medicine; the clinical faculty and with University of Chicago Medical Center to ensure that the institution has the best and most successful clinical practice possible.
 
Baron has served as chairman of the Department of Radiology at the University of Chicago since 2002. He will relinquish this position when he assumes his new role.  An interim leader of the Department of Radiology will be appointed and a search for a permanent successor will begin.
 
Baron completed his undergraduate education at Yale University cum laude, and graduated from the Washington University, St. Louis School of Medicine in 1976 as a member of Alpha Omega Alpha. Following an internship in internal medicine at Yale, he completed his radiology residency and fellowship at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University. After serving on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Washington, he served as chairman of the Department of Radiology at the University of Pittsburgh from 1992 to 1999.
 
A pioneer in CT and MRI liver and biliary tract imaging applications, Baron has more than 135 published articles and 50 book chapters/review articles. He has received numerous awards for his research, served as visiting professor at many institutions worldwide and delivered numerous named lectures nationally and abroad. He has received many national and international honors and awards.
 
He brings to this position extensive experience in academic physician practices.  While at the University of Pittsburgh he was the founding President and CEO of the University of Pittsburgh Physicians, one of the country’s largest medical provider groups (currently with more than 2,100 physicians), and served in that role from 1997 to 2002. As chair of Radiology here at the University of Chicago he has been active in key roles focusing on hospital- and BSD-wide physician practice issues.
 
In the next few months Baron will set up appointments to attend departmental faculty meetings so that he can receive broad input on how to move forward. The success of this venture is critically dependent on the engagement of the faculty.

 






Richard Cook
Richard Cook, MD, associate professor of anesthesia and critical care
Cook to Serve on Federal Health Information Technology Committee

Richard I. Cook, MD, associate professor of anesthesia and critical care, has been appointed to the Institute of Medicine’s Patient Safety and Health Information Technology committee. The committee will review available evidence and experience from the field on how health information technology (HIT) affects the safety of patient care.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the committee will produce a report that will recommend options and opportunities for public and private interventions that may improve the safety of patient care that incorporates health information technology.

Cook worked in the computer industry in supercomputer system design and engineering applications. He has investigated a variety of problems in such diverse areas as urban mass transportation, semiconductor manufacturing and military software systems. He often serves as a consultant for not-for-profit organizations, government agencies and academic groups. Currently he serves as director of the Cognitive Technologies Laboratory at the University of Chicago.

 






Melissa Gilliam
Melissa Gilliam, MD, MPH, chief of family planning
Gilliam Appointed to Federal Committee on Preventive Services for Women

Melissa Gilliam, MD, MPH, chief of family planning, has been appointed to the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Preventive Services for Women. The committee will review which preventive services are necessary for women’s health and well-being and should be considered in the development of comprehensive guidelines for preventive services for women. The committee also will provide guidance on a process for regularly updating the preventive screenings and services to be considered. An expert in pediatric and adolescent gynecology, Gilliam specializes in bleeding problems, pelvic surgery, breast disease and abnormal pap smears. Her pediatric and adolescent gynecology practice focuses on the treatment of complex gynecologic problems in girls and young women.

An active researcher, Gilliam has been an investigator in several studies related to contraception and family planning. Specifically, she focuses on contraceptive use among teens and women who are at risk for unintended pregnancy. She also serves as director of the fellowship in family planning, which is dedicated to training specialists in high-level research and clinical skills related to all aspects of family planning.



 






Marla Solomon
Marla Solomon, RD, certified diabetes educator
Solomon Named Diabetes Educator of the Year

Marla Solomon, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator for University of Chicago Medical Center, has been selected as Outstanding Diabetes Educator of the Year by the Diabetes Educators Chicago Area American Association of Diabetes Educators.
  
Selected by a panel of peer judges, recipients of this award have demonstrated outstanding leadership in diabetes education and made significant contributions in diabetes education to the community, their peers and other healthcare professionals.

As a member of the Diabetes Research and Training Center, Solomon has played a leading role in several community-based research projects, including the Reach-Out Chicago Children’s Diabetes Prevention Project, a five year study of family approaches to healthy nutrition and exercise on Chicago’s South Side.

Solomon is a dietitian for the Diabetes Research and Training Center, one of only six centers throughout the US that is funded by National Institute of Health. She also is a founding member of the Illinois Diabetes Policy Coalition, an advocacy group that ensures that proper measures are implemented by the legislation for people living with diabetes and diabetes prevention.  

 






Donald Steiner
Donald Steiner, A.N. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago
Steiner Receives Honorary Doctorate

Donald Steiner, A.N. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, received an honorary doctorate from the University of Copenhagen on November 19, 2010.

Steiner, a professor of biochemistry and molecular biophysics, is known for his research on insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. His discoveries have provided new insight into the production of insulin as well as other hormones and neuropeptides, and also established a route for the production of human insulin for treating patients with diabetes. Steiner and his colleagues also have devised methods for measuring insulin and its precursors in human serum.

Steiner, a graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, first described in 1965 how insulin is made from proinsulin, the first "pro-hormone." His contributions to understanding the biochemical nature of insulin production and the development of C-peptide measurement have had profound clinical implications. His work led to major improvements in purity and reduced immunogenicity (the provoking of an immune response) of therapeutic insulin and ultimately to the development, via proinsulin, of recombinant human insulin for diabetes therapy.

In 1984, he was awarded the Wolf Prize of Medicine. Earlier this year, he received the Manpei Suzuki International Prize for Diabetes Research.







Janet Rowley
Janet Rowley, MD, the
Blum Riese Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine
Rowley Receives Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Janet Davison Rowley, MD, a pioneering cancer geneticist, has been named a recipient of the 2010 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awarded by The Rockefeller University. Created to recognize the accomplishments of outstanding female scientists, the $100,000 prize was presented at a ceremony in the university’s Caspary Auditorium on November 16, 2010.

Rowley, Blum Riese Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine, provided the first compelling evidence that genetic abnormalities are a critical factor in cancer. Her discoveries of chromosomal translocations in leukemia and lymphoma have revolutionized cancer research and treatment.

In the 1970s, Rowley’s arguments that chromosomal translocations caused specific diseases were in opposition to the established view, which held that chromosomal abnormalities played little role in the cause of cancer. Later, Rowley’s work was proven correct and by 1990, more than 70 translocations linked to various cancers had been identified.

The successful cancer drug Gleevec is one of the outcomes of Rowley’s seminal findings. A member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, she has received numerous honors, including the Albert Lasker Award, the National Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. She has published more than four hundred articles and continues her research at the University of Chicago.

 




Grab a Healthy Lunch
 
Look for new low-sodium, low-fat meals in special lunch bags in campus cafeterias. The “Wellness Simply to Go” meals contain healthy sandwiches, fruit, vegetables and drinks such as tomato juice or water.
 
Offered by the Department of Food Services, the $5 meals are available in the Billings Café (in the basement) and the Food Court in the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine. They are designed to make it easy for staff, visitors and others to grab a healthy lunch quickly.
 
The lunches are contained inside brown bags that are surrounded by clear plastic. They each contain nutrition information on the meals inside.




Sola Olopade
'Sola Olopade, MD, clinical director of the Global Health Initiative
Olopade Wins Prestigious Award

’Sola Olopade, MD, MPH, has won an award from The CHEST Foundation for a community service project he is conducting in Nigeria, his birth country.

Olopade, clinical director of the Global Health Initiative, recently launched an effort against indoor air pollution in three rural communities in Nigeria. Indoor air pollution remains a problem in the developing world because of the extensive use of firewood, agricultural products and other forms of biomass for cooking food. Toxic fumes have created serious health effects including acute lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

The World Health Organization estimates that indoor air pollution is responsible for roughly 1.6 million deaths each year.

Olopade’s project was one of four to win a $7,500 grant from The CHEST Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the American College of Chest Physicians. Olopade also was recognized at The CHEST Foundation’s Making a Difference Awards Dinner and Presentation on October 30 in Vancouver, B.C., Canada.
 






New Research to Seek Genetic Clues Behind Early-Onset Breast Cancer

Women who develop breast cancer before age 50 are more likely to die of the disease and also more likely to experience a recurrence. Researchers at the University of Chicago hope to discover the roots of these two patterns in a new project funded by a $1 million grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

 

The researchers are examining the genes of 4,000 women who developed breast cancer before age 50 and have had the disease for at least 10 years. Specifically, they are looking at 600,000 markers, or elements, of those genes to determine which genetic variations account for the lower survival and higher recurrence rates among these patient.

 

“We hope that this study will identify specific genetic variations that can be used to predict breast cancer outcomes among women with early onset breast cancer," says Habibul Ahsan, MD, professor of Health Studies, Medicine and Human Genetics at the University of Chicago and director of the Center for Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention at the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center.

If the researchers are successful, a blood test could be used to identify women with a better or worse prognosis for their early-onset breast cancer. The researchers also hope to develop new strategies for disease detection, treatment and prevention.

“The research project also will generate knowledge that will advance future pharmacological, translational, epidemiological and basic research with an enormous potential for enhancing the care of patients with breast cancer,” Ahsan said.




Lynn H. Throckmorton, 1927-2009

Lynn Throckmorton, PhD, professor emeritus of biology at the University of Chicago, died December 14, 2009, after long illness.

An evolutionary biologist who studied genetic variation, fitness and the development of species, Throckmorton, working with colleagues John Hubby and Richard Lewontin, did important research on the biogeography of fruit flies and on the genetic differences between individuals of the same species.

Throckmorton, Hubby and their graduate student, Maureen Sims, jointly were the first to demonstrate in flies that protein variants (detected by their difference in charge) behaved as strictly Mendelian traits. 

"This opened up a vast field of research not only in fruit flies," said Janice Spofford, PhD, associate professor emeritus in the Committees on Evolutionary Biology and Genetics, "In conjunction with work of others in other types of organisms, this launched the field of experimental evolutionary genetics and added a new tool for the use of taxonomists."  Lewontin, then at the U of C and now retired from Harvard, "saw this opening vista," she said, "and made good use of it."

Born December 20, 1927, in Loup City, Nebraska, Throckmorton earned his PhD from the University of Texas in 1959 and came to the University of Chicago as a research associate in 1961. He remained on the faculty for the rest of his career, rising through the ranks to professor in 1971. He served as chairman of the Committee on Evolutionary Biology from 1973 to 1976.

Throckmorton's detailed classification of the thousands of species in the Drosophila genus and its near relatives is still in use.






Alexander Gottschalk, 1932 - 2010
Alexander Gottschalk, MD, former chair of the Department of Radiology
Former Radiology Chair Dies

Alexander Gottschalk, MD, former chair of the Department of Radiology, died October 5. Born in 1932 in Chicago, Gottschalk was a widely recognized researcher and author who helped to shape modern medical imaging.

 

He received the gold medal at the 2004 meeting of the Radiological Society of North America for his research and contributions to radiology. Gottschalk was noted as one of the early physicians to recognize the value of magnetic resonance imaging in the technology’s early days, and he performed the first dynamic camera studies of the brain and heart using technetium-99m, a radioactive tracer.

 

Among other achievements, he established a pioneering cardiovascular nuclear medicine operation at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and authored or co-authored nearly 400 publications. He spent a decade at the University of Chicago, where he helped form the university’s first section of nuclear medicine. He also served as director of the Argonne Cancer Research Hospital.

 

He is survived by his wife, Jane Gottschalk, as well as three children and five grandchildren.





Help the Medical Center Advance Breast Cancer Research

You can vote to help the Medical Center advance breast cancer research! Suzanne Zaccone, a survivor of the disease, and the Zaccone Family Foundation have applied for a grant from the Pepsi Refresh Project. If Zaccone’s proposal receives enough votes, the University of Chicago Medical Center will receive a $250,000 grant to provide fellowships for breast cancer research, handbooks and counseling for women with breast cancer, and more. Go here to cast your vote.

Earlier this year, Zaccone published her book about her experience with breast cancer, A Random Interruption. All proceeds benefit the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center. The book includes a section by David Song, MD, FACS, chief of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.




Staff Members to Lead Seminars at Medical Education Conference

Six staff members and administrators of the University of Chicago Medical Center and the Pritzker School of Medicine will serve as panel discussion leaders during the annual conference of the American Association of Medical Colleges, in Washington, D.C., November 5 to 10.

Considered the nation’s largest forum for academic medicine, the conference attracts nearly 4,000 physicians, medical education specialists and other attendees from across the nation.

In a panel discussion on the need to address debt among medical students, Holly Humphrey, MD, dean for medical education, will describe the Pritzker School of Medicine’s Repayment for Education to Alumni in Community Health (REACH) program. The program provides up to four years of financial support for Pritzker graduates who complete a residency in primary care or certain specialties and then return to practice medicine at a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) or a community hospital in the Medical Center's primary service area.

Other seminars featuring University of Chicago speakers or moderators include:

“Health Care Reform: The Role of Research in Addressing the Needs of Patients, Populations, and System Change:” Eric Whitaker, MD, MPH, executive vice president for strategic affiliations and associate dean for community-based research

“Preparing for the New ACGME Supervision Standards: Stories from the Field”: Vineet Arora, MD, assistant dean of scholarship and discovery at the Pritzker School of Medicine

“Changes in Perception of and Participation in Unprofessional Behaviors During Internship:” Arora; Humphrey; Jeanne Farnan, MD, MHPE, assistant professor of medicine; and Shalini Reddy, MD, associate professor of medicine

“Patient Safety Education: Going from Avoiding Potholes to Preventing Them,” “Incorporating Social Media Tools into Medical Education” and “Preparing for the New ACGME Supervision Standards: Stories from the Field:” Arora

“Shades of Gray: Finding Consensus on Unprofessional Online Content:” Farnan and Reddy

“Physician Career Decisions” and “Professional Identity Development and Specialty Choice: Promoting Purposeful Reflection:” Reddy

“Potpourri in GME:” Humphrey

“Teaching Cultural Competence and Reducing Health Disparities Across the Trainee Continuum: A Multi-institutional Perspective:” Susan Glick, MD, associate professor of medicine



Nurses Selected for Managerial Positions

The Medical Center congratulates 11 nurses who recently advanced in their careers and were hired or promoted as nursing managers throughout the hospital:

 

Meredith Borak, ACM, Mitchell 4 – Multispecialty

Donna Bozga, ACM, Critical Care

Norma Cintron, ACM, Critical Care

George Daly, PCM, Mitchell Hospital 5SE

Karen Fiala, PCM, Labor and Delivery

Joseph Giannini, ACM, Oncology

Elaine Pankowski, ACM, Mitchell Hospital 5SE

Abigail Poiner, ACM, Critical Care

Rachael Reid, PCM, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Aurika Savickaite, PCM, Critical Care

Tamia Walker, ACM, Critical Care







Karen Arndt
From left to right: ASTNA President Kyle Madigan and Roger Tangerose (Regional Vice President, Air Methods) present Karen Arndt, RN, with the 2010 Katz-Mason Award during the annual ASTNA membership meeting.
Karen Arndt
Photo credit: Cheryl L. Reed

Karen Arndt, RN, administrative director and chief flight nurse, in Haiti with the young Haitian flight crew she taught.
Arndt Honored by ASTNA at Annual Air Medical Transport Conference


Karen Arndt, RN, administrative director and chief flight nurse for the University of Chicago Aeromedical Network, was honored by the Air and Surface Transport Nurses Association (ASTNA) at the annual Air Medical Transport Conference in Fort Lauderdale. Arndt received the 2010 Katz-Mason Award, which is presented for exceptional leadership to an individual who has had a positive impact on flight transport nursing on a global scale. This award is considered ASTNA’s highest honor. Arndt also was recognized as she completed her term as immediate past president, culminating 11 years of service on the ASTNA Board of Directors.
















































Thomas Wellems
Thomas Wellems, MD, PhD, chief of the laboratory of malaria and vector research at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
Five NIH Leaders Elected to the Institute of Medicine

University of Chicago alumnus Thomas Wellems, MD, PhD,  is among five leaders at the National Institutes of Health who have been elected to the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences said.

Election to the IOM is one of the highest honors in the fields of medicine and health, the academy said.

Wellems is perhaps best known for discovering the gene responsible for resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine and for his role in developing the first rapid diagnostic test for malaria. Wellems earned his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. Following an internal medicine residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, he joined NIAID's Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases. He headed the malaria genetics section in the NIAID Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research (LMVR), a position he still holds today, for several years before he was appointed chief of LMVR in 2002.

Other NIH officials elected are: Jeremy M. Berg, Ph.D., director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS); Linda S. Birnbaum, Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Ira H. Pastan, M.D., chief of the laboratory of cell biology, Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute; and Carl Wu, Ph.D., chief of the laboratory of biochemistry and molecular biology, Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute.

"These researchers and administrators have contributed consistently to the advancement of medicine, public health and research," said NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD.







Elbert Huang
Elbert Huang, MD, associate professor of medicine

Huang to Serve as Adviser in U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


Elbert Huang, associate professor of medicine, has been selected to serve as a senior advisor to the assistant secretary for planning and evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

 

HHS now is engaged in implementing the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), a federal statute signed into law by President Barack Obama earlier this year. The law expands Medicaid eligibility, subsidizes insurance premiums, offers tax incentives for businesses to provide health care benefits and creates other provisions to expand access to health care services.

 

In his new role in Washington, D.C., Huang will provide substantial leadership and expertise in health economics, as well as clinical and health care policy. He will assist in the planning, communication, research and reporting that are necessary to maintain oversight of research and evaluation projects relevant for implementation of the PPACA.

 

A widely published health care researcher, Huang is noted for his expertise in care for medically underserved populations.






Holly Humphrey
Holly Humphrey, MD, dean for medical education at the Pritzker School of Medicine
Humphrey to Receive 2010 Outstanding Leader Award from the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago

Holly Humphrey, MD, dean for medical education, will receive the 2010 Outstanding Leader Award from the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago on October 14. The award recognizes women who have achieved high levels of personal and professional success. The YWCA praised Humphrey for the numerous programs she has launched to educate and enrich students at the Pritzker School of Medicine, including the Bowman Society, the Pritzker Initiative and the Pritzker Advising and Mentoring Societies. The YWCA also honored Humphrey as a nationally recognized leader in medical education who has won numerous awards, including the Laureate Award from the American College of Physicians and the Dema C. Daley Founders Award from the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine.












Neil Shubin
Neil Shubin, PhD, Robert R. Bensley Professor and associate dean for organismal and evolutionary biology
Shubin Chosen for Fellowship in California Academy of Sciences

Neil Shubin, PhD, Robert R. Bensley Professor and associate dean for organismal and evolutionary biology, has been inducted to the California Academy of Sciences as an Academy Fellow.

The academy is a governing group of 300 distinguished scientists who have made notable contributions to the natural sciences. Fellows are nominated by their colleagues and selected by the Board of Trustees.

Shubin researches the evolutionary origin of anatomical features of animals. He has conducted field work in Greenland, China, Canada, much of North America and Africa, and he has published multiple articles in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleobiology, as well as more than 18 articles in Science and Nature. Shubin’s most recent discovery, Tiktaalik roseae, has been dubbed the “missing link” between fish and land animals.

His latest book, Your Inner Fish: A Journey through the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body, was published in 2008.





Richard Miller
Barbara Kirschner, MD, professor of pediatrics and medicine

Kirschner to Be Honored by Illinois Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation

Barbara Kirschner, MD, professor of pediatrics and medicine, will be honored by the Illinois Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation at its annual “A Celebration of Hope Dinner” on October 31. Kirschner is an internationally recognized expert in the field of pediatric gastroenterology and is regularly listed in "America's Top Doctors" as well as "Top Doctors in Chicago" by Chicago magazine. In 2001, she was honored with the Chicago Pediatric Society's Joseph Brenneman, MD, Award for Outstanding Contributions to Academic Pediatrics.


Kirschner has presented lectures on pediatric gastroenterology all over the world, including Sweden, Switzerland, France, India, Italy, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. She serves on the editorial board for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and reviews articles for several medical journals, including Gastroenterology, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Lancet, and Gut.





New Intranet Wellness Page


Medical Center employees now have a single place they can go to learn about health and wellness. The new Intranet wellness page includes many helpful resources such as:
  • Monthly wellness topics with links to external websites on that topic.
  • Health Tip of the Week that highlights facts related to the monthly topic.
  • Links to resources provided by our employee health plans (Blue Cross Blue Shield, Caremark). Some require enrollment in the plan and others do not.
  • Quick links to other resources such as EAP, the Ratner Center and wellness services sponsored by Occupational Medicine.
  • Links to Web sites promoting events in the Chicago area such as the Comer Kid’s Classic and the Heart Walk.

This new page can be found on the Intranet, under the HR & Benefits tab, by clicking the “Wellness” box with “a Better U” logo.

Click here for more information.






Richard Miller
Richard Miller, CPA, MBA, PhD, Vice President for Finance
Miller Selected as Vice President for Finance

Richard B. Miller will take a new position as the University of Chicago Medical Center’s vice president for finance, effective October 1st. This position, which reports to the chief financial and strategy officer, oversees the Medical Center’s revenue cycle, operating and capital budget groups, financial analysis and reporting, accounting, payroll and accounts payable departments.

Miller joined the Medical Center in 1984 and has held positions of increasing responsibility in finance and audit, most recently as executive director of finance and controller. He is a graduate of Oberlin College, has an MBA from the Keller Graduate School of Management and has a PhD in philosophy from the University of Chicago. He is a certified public accountant and certified internal auditor, and he also served in the United States Marine Corps Reserve.








mark_siegler
Mark Siegler, MD, director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics
University of Chicago's Mark Siegler to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award from National Bioethics Group

The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities will present a Lifetime Achievement Award to Mark Siegler, MD, director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago.

The award, to be presented on October 23, recognizes an individual whose outstanding contributions and significant publications have helped shape the direction of the fields of bioethics and medical humanities.

The Lindy Bergman Distinguished Service Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the University, Siegler is known for insightful writings on the physician-patient relationship, the development of the field of clinical medical ethics, improved end-of-life care for patients and new ethical approaches to innovations in surgery and cancer care.

For more details about the award, please visit the Medical Center website.






lucilleLester
Lucille Lester, MD, section chief of pediatric pulmonary medicine
Lester Honored with Award from Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

The Greater Illinois Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is honoring Lucille Lester, MD, section chief of pediatric pulmonary medicine, with its Lifetime Achievement Award on October 8. Lester is director of the University of Chicago Cystic Fibrosis Center and has cared for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) for more than 30 years. She has written dozens of clinical articles and book chapters on lung conditions affecting children. She also has collaborated on research on new treatments for CF lung disease and on the genetics of asthma, and has presented at numerous national medical conferences. The Lifetime Achievement Award will be presented by a parent and a patient with CF.













ramaJager
Rama Jager, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology and visual science
Jager Leads New Treatment Effort for Eye Disorder

Rama Jager, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology and visual science, recently was recognized for using an innovative new treatment for diabetic retinopathy patients. Jager is director of University Retina and Macula Associates of Oak Forest, Illinois, which recently became the first site in the world to use the Navilas navigated photocoagulation system to treat diabetic retinopathy patients. Recently cleared by the FDA, the system utilizes a novel registration technology to follow eye movement during surgery and deliver laser energy precisely at intended treatment sites.

“In retina surgery, a fraction of a millimeter means a lot. Navilas is the first photocoagulation device to allow precise localized targeting of retinal pathologies and adjust for patient eye movement during surgery,” said Seenu Hariprasad, MD, director of clinical research and chief of Vitreoretinal Service. Hariprasad was instrumental in early clinical evaluations of the technology, according to the system’s developer, OD-OS Retina Navigation Co.




Cancer Research Grants Available


The American Cancer Society is making institutional research grants available to junior faculty who are members of, or eligible for membership in, the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center. The ACS will award four grants, each worth $35,000 for a year’s worth of research. At least one grant will fund research in population sciences (e.g., cancer prevention or control, epidemiology or health services). The deadline for grant applications is October 18. For application instructions and forms, e-mail Lee Baksas at lbaksas@bsd.uchicago.edu or go directly to the UCCCC website.




Announcing Benefit Changes in Response to Employee Feedback

Preceptor pay will be provided to ambulatory nurses and technical staff who provide orientation support to new employees within their work groups. This benefit is for non-management, bi-weekly employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements. Staff assigned to preceptor duty will be compensated at a rate of $1 per hour over their regular rate of pay.

Benefits to cover various educational expenses (non-tuition) will be provided to non-management employees not covered by collective bargaining agreements and managers who want to receive credit for:
  • Continuing Education Units (CEU) for certification/registration/licensure 
  • Other non-credit professional development coursework.
Reimbursement limits are up to $300 per fiscal year for full-time employees and up to $150 per fiscal year for part-time employees.

For more information about either of these benefit changes, please contact your manager.